Flashback: Teen stickers send message on alcohol

Teen stickers send message on alcohol

By Lisa Roose-Church, Daily Press and Argus
June 17, 2010

Kensington Woods High School students, from left, Colin McElhone, Lauren Stockelman and Sean Nichol place bright-yellow stickers that read, in part, "Providing Alcohol to Minors Is Illegal," on multipacks of alcohol at a Livingston County store June 10. (SUBMITTED PHOTO)

Kensington Woods High School students, from left, Colin McElhone, Lauren Stockelman and Sean Nichol place bright-yellow stickers that read, in part, "Providing Alcohol to Minors Is Illegal," on multipacks of alcohol at a Livingston County store June 10. (SUBMITTED PHOTO)

The next time customers purchase a multipack of alcohol in Livingston County, they may find a bright-yellow sticker offering a simple reminder - "Providing Alcohol to Minors Is Illegal."

Students with Kensington Woods High School placed the stickers, which also read "Fines are up to $2,500 and/or up to 90 days in jail," on multipacks of alcohol at Venture Corners, Howell Village Market and Whistle Stop Party Store on June 10.

Other businesses showing their support include Howell-area stores VG's, Jonna's, Midway Party Store and Woodland Party Store as well as the Hartland General Store and Fowlerville businesses Save-On Foods, Mobil and O'Connor's Deli.

"These partners have shown their desire to manage the sale of alcohol responsibly," Daydra Cormican, coordinator for the Livingston County Community Alliance, said.

The impetus behind the project is that the stickers will reach adults who might be tempted to purchase alcohol for youth under 21, who cannot legally buy it themselves.

Hannah Sesi, co-owner of Whistle Stop Party Store at the intersection of Grand River Avenue and Chilson Road in Genoa Township, said the stickers do have an effect, as she and her partner have allowed similar stickers at their Oak Park store and customers have noticed.

"People do look at it and do notice it, and they make comments," she said. "It also lets the younger crowd under 21 know that we're aware and we're on it.

"I love to see young kids get involved that way," Sesi said. "It says a lot about them."

Kensington sophomore Lauren Stockelman and junior Sean Nichol both said they hope adults see the sticker and heed its message.

"I hope it raises awareness," 15-year-old Stockelman, of Howell, said. "It's not right; kids aren't responsible enough to drink."

Nichol added: "People get killed because of drunk driving. ... It's wrong to buy it for minors."

The service project, titled Project Sticker Shock, is a volunteer-driven initiative to change adult attitudes about selling and providing alcohol to minors. It is part of an ongoing campaign to get parents to stop hosting underage drinking parties.

The project was funded by a grant from the Michigan Department of Community Health's Office of Drug Control Policy that was procured by the Livingston County Community Alliance. The grant is managed by the Livingston/Washtenaw Substance Abuse Coordinating Agency and Washtenaw County Public Health.